Tag: creation science

About That Star.

I have a lot of regrets as a parent. One thing I’ve never regretted though, is making the extra effort to experience things first hand rather than passively watching them on a screen as we are so trained to do today. They even want us to passively watch church on a screen! The advent of TV and internet has brought us a lot of things. But one thing it has taken away is real first-hand experience in God’s created world. Just like church on a screen is no substitute for the real thing, neither is observing the heavens that Psalm 19 describes as declaring the glory of God. Packing the kids up in the middle of the night to drive to the top of Hawaii’s highest mountain, Mauna Kea, just so we could see it cast it’s pyramid shaped shadow over the ocean as the sun rose over the Pacific– totally worth it. Driving out to the Kona airport to wait in line so the NASA folks could let us see the Venus transit of the sun through their fancy telescopes– totally worth it. Pulling everyone out of bed in the pre-dawn hours to wander sleepily out onto the golf course just to watch the ISS pass overhead– totally worth it. And yes, packing up our dinner and driving down the road to watch the last-seen-in-1226-conjunction-of-Jupiter-and-Saturn last night was also totally worth it.

Was this occurrence the reappearing of the “Christmas Star” followed by the Magi in Matthew 2 as some suggest? I don’t know. Does it’s appearing still declare a whole lot about the glory of God? Absolutely. You can’t look at the red striations of Jupiter as it’s flanked by 4 visible moons or Saturn all dressed up in her hoops through a telescope like we did and not see the glory of God. Unless you’re lying. But even without a telescope there’s still a lot to learn about His glory. Consider the following:

What looks like a tiny dot is actually 2 giant gas planets. The first and largest is Jupiter, about 318 times the size of Earth and nearly 500 million miles away from us. Saturn is another 450 million miles beyond Jupiter. Yet last night they looked like they were bumping right into each other!

And then we have that average sized star known as the Sun setting in the bottom right corner of the same picture. It’s a mere 91 million miles away from us but about 1.3 million times larger. And that’s just our little cul-de-sac in the sprawling cosmic metropolis of the Milky Way.

The distance from our sun to it’s nearest celestial neighbor, a binary star known as Alpha Centauri, is 25 trillion miles, or 4.2 light years. There are about 100-400 billion such stars in our galaxy which is 100,000 light-years across. The nearest galaxy to ours is the Andromeda Galaxy at a whopping 2.5 million light-years away. As far as astronomers can guess there are some 2 Trillion such galaxies in the known universe, which according to their calculations is expanding at about 50 miles per second.

Now let’s zoom way down into the visible matter composing a mere 5% of the universe. Most of that is empty space, too. In fact if you take one of the most common elements, the hydrogen atom, you’d find that besides the proton, neutrons, and electrons you’d have about 99.9999999999996% of practically nothing. To put the amount of space in an atom in perspective, if a hydrogen atom were the size of the earth, the proton at its center would be about 600 feet across.

So the question is: what’s stopping the whole thing from flying apart?

Answer: Jesus

I saw a manger scene recently where the baby Jesus was gripping Mary’s index finger the way we all love infants to do. Pretty profound considering He was in fact at that moment holding together every single atom that made up, not just Mary’s finger, but the rest of her as well. Truly the entire universe was in His infant grasp.

Just listen how Colossians 1:15-20 puts Christ’s incarnation and role in all of creation into a doxology,

“HE is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. For by Him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities–all things were created through Him and for Him. And He is before all things, and IN HIM ALL THINGS HOLD TOGETHER. And He is the head of the body, the church. He is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in everything He might be preeminent. For in Him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, and through Him to reconcile to Himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of His cross.”

May those words be in your heart and on your tongue next time you step outside and look up at the night sky or feel the grasp of a newborn babe.

Off Like A Herd Of Turtles

We always start our first day of school with THE FIRST DAY OF EVERYTHING!

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We are off to a pretty slow start this year.  Maybe we’re all just a little worn out from Gideon’s epic “Down By The Creekbank” Birthday celebration.  Am I the only one who remembers “The Creekbank Kids?”  No one around here seemed to get my theme.

 

What could be more fun than wiggly worms, tiny tree frogs, and big ol’ toads?

Except for maybe cupcakes with gummy frogs on top?

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Or even better yet, a turtle piñata full of sour worms, gold fish crackers, gummy bears and DumDums? Pretty sure I got the whole food chain in there.  Why is it so fun to look at pictures of poor little blind folded children desperately swinging a stick at the air.

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I’d like to say that we really are going to buckle down this week and get serious about school but unfortunately we only have more fun in store around here.  Homeschool Family Camp starts this Thursday!  If you’ve never experienced the thrill that is Hartland Homeschool Family Camp you are seriously missing out.  You can learn more about it by clicking here.

And finally, did you know that 6 years ago today we were starting our school year off on the Big Island of Hawaii studying birds?  Well, it’s that time again.  We’ve gone through all the days of creation and have arrived back at the flying and swimming creatures of the fifth day.  So we’re resurrecting our old “Winged Wisdom” blog and have given it a new name: “Of Skies and Seas.”  You can follow us on over there by clicking here.  Happy Back-to-School everyone!

Friday Factoid Week 30

Hartland Homeschool Family Camp Recap

We learned how back then the space ships had these tanks and they were  as big as the space shuttle.  Dr. Ortner dropped a match into a tank and it ignited really big and then came out the top.  We learned how to make rockets and I invented my own rocket (by Gideon, age 5).

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For Homeschool Family Camp the science teacher was Dr. Ortner.  We made rockets and learned about the gas in rockets and he lit some on fire.  He is also the Million Volt Man and he sent a million volts of electricity through his body and lightning was coming out of his fingers.  He was holding a board and it lit on fire (by Sam, age 10).

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Dr. Ortner, also known as the Million Volt Man, was going to shock himself with a million volts and before he did he showed us what the electricity looked like before he stood on the coil and it was shooting lightening everywhere.  There was also a ventriloquist and he is the best in the world.  He does really funny shows.  Mr. Griffin was the speaker and he was really into the Word.  I can’t wait till next homeschool family camp (by Nathan, age 12).

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Homeschool Family Camp is really cool.  I would recommend it to every homeschooling family. One of my favorite parts was science class. They were great this year.  One of the many things I learned from Dr. Ortner was about heavy water which they use for the Star in the Jar experiment.  Here is a link to a video about sonoluminescence. (by Joel, age 13).

We recently saw a science demonstration about electrical and sound frequency.  It was interesting to learn about how scientists and even natural forces can produce the perfect frequency of sound or energy to tap into a substance’s or element’s natural pitch of resonance and cause the substance to vibrate in resonance to the sound or energy wave produced. We were able to witness a demonstration of this interesting effect when an ordinary water glass was subjected to a sound wave which caused the glass to tremor and eventually shatter. It will be interesting to see how further knowledge of this unique and useful scientific property will be used in the future (by Titus, age 15).