Tolle Lege: “A Company of Heroes” by Tim Keesee

I often say these five boys are going to be the death of me.  Every time I turn around one of them is doing something daring or dangerous or dumb.  It’s a fine line, right?  Especially with my second born, Joel, who has taken on “watch this!” as his middle name.  That’s when he wants witnesses to his feats.  Mostly I just hear about them after the fact.  Every now and then I catch him in the act.  Like when we lived in Hawaii and I was gazing across the room toward our third floor lanai and saw Joel’s 9-year-old head pop over the balcony railing.  He had scaled the 30 feet of drain pipe to get up and over.  Rarely, am I quick enough to snatch a picture of these exploits but here are a few recents.

Joel is the one on the far left of the rattlesnake which he and his brother, Titus, killed, skinned, cooked and ate.

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Can you spot Joel on a pole?  “Watch me turn hanging out with cousins in Oma and Opa’s suburban front yard into a dangerous activity!”

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Can you spot Joel in a hole?  Because who WOULDN’T want to spend the night burrowed into a snow bank with nothing but a sleeping bag on one of the coldest nights of the year?  

How does a mom channel that kind of thirst for thrills into more noble pursuits?  Lately, when I hear talk of going faster, or higher, or deeper (yes, they’ve discovered spelunking) I insert the suggestion that if they want to die doing something daring they should do it taking the gospel into a dangerous place.  Then I like to drive the point home by pulling out a missionary biography for them to read.  Joel seems to have developed a genuine interest in these more gospel-driven adventures.

Most recently, he read through Tim Keesee’s, “A Company of Heroes” (Crossway, 2019) and wrote up the following review:

I asked to read this book because I wanted to get a perspective on mission work around the world.  Tim Keesee does this by following missionaries and documenting the work they do sharing the gospel.  The book is actually a diary of these encounters so sometimes its not even in complete sentences.  But I really liked the format and the stories.  I learned about how the gospel is advancing globally and how men and women are risking their lives for the sake of Christ.  My favorite part took place in North Africa where this one couple is handing out hundreds of Bibles and so the police are always after them but they won’t stop because they know the gospel is worth more than their lives.  Overall, the book was really good.  I even liked how the Tim Keesee included quotes from other authors at the beginning of each chapter to go along with each story.  One of them by John Piper kind of sums up the whole book,

“So I say this very sobering word: God’s plan is that his saving purpose for the nations will triumph through the suffering of his people, especially his frontline forces who break through the darkness of Satan’s blinding hold on an unreached people” (23).  

I recommend this book for other people interested in mission work because it will encourage and inspire them to put the gospel first (by Joel, age 13).  

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(Even though I was given a copy of this book by the publisher I am not required to write a favorable review)

Friday Factoid Week 27

So we’ve been celebrating International Astronomy Month pretty hard around here and as it comes to a close I wanted to share cool milestone for our blog. This month Ecuador became the 100th country to visit Godmadeknown!

 

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This year we’ve been going through the book “Operation World” and praying for each of the countries that our blog has reached. Praise the Lord for technology that can carry the Gospel to unreached places of the world! But more importantly, can you join us in praying for the real live people who are giving up everything and actually taking the good news of Jesus Christ to these countries? I can think of no better way to celebrate International Astronomy Month than in joining in prayer for others around the world to come to a saving faith in the Creator of all those amazing stars!

Week 26

Memory Verse:  Isaiah 49:10

Questions:  Which elements of nature will the Lord protect His people from in the day of salvation?                

Reading #1:  Jonah

Questions:  In Jonah 1:4,15 and 17, which elements of nature does the Lord control?  In Jonah 4:6,7, and 8, which elements of nature does the Lord control? In Jonah 4:1 how does Jonah respond to the Lord’s grace, mercy, patience, and love for Nineveh? Later in verse 9 how does Jonah respond to God causing the sun to wither the plant?

Reading #2:  Mark 4

Questions:  In verse 6, which element of nature is responsible for the withering away of the rootless plant?  According to verse 17 what does the scorching sun represent?  In verses 39 and 40 which element of Nature does Jesus control?

Reading #3:  James 1:1-18

Questions:  According to verses 2-4 and 12 what is the purpose and the result of our trials?  How does that contrast with the one who pursues a life of wealth and ease in verse 11?

Reading #4:  Revelation 16:1-11

Questions:  In verse 8,9 what element of nature does the Lord control?  How do the people respond to God’s power?

Psalms and Hymns:

I know Who Holds Tomorrow “I don’t know about tomorrow, I just live from day to day, I don’t borrow from its sunshine, for its skies may turn to gray.”

Jesus Shall Reign “Jesus shall reign where ‘er the sun does his successive journeys run; His kingdom spread from shore to shore, till moons shall wax and wane no more.”

Praying Under the Same Sky:

Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand